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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the holidays. >>> across spain thursday, coordinated demonstrations were head in dozens of cities to protest cuts in education. it's part of austerity measures aimed at lifting the country out of diet dep. spain's recession is hurting the theater business, too, but as mark phillips reports, one owner found a way to sell tickets. >> reporter: other places, theatrical productions may be about drama and song. in spain right now, though, they're also about vegetables, specifically -- >> carrots. carrots. >> reporter: carrots. the humble root which may determine whether kym marsh's theater in the town near barcelona lives or dies and a lot of others too. why? because the spanish government has recently just about tripled the sales tax on theater tickets and kym fears that no one would ever fill these seats, until he made a discovery whiles out shopping. the tax on carrots is 4%. >> 4%, yes. >> reporter: the tax on theater tickets -- >> 21%. >> reporter: 21%. kym marsh did the math. food for the body, 4% tax. food for the soul, 21%. there had to be a way to bridge the gap. there was. kym doesn't s
whole >>> rain on christmas day, more showers into wednesday >>> it's been a difficult year in spain. one in four people there out of work, but it's ending with some christmas cheer. nearly 2,000 people hit the jackpot in the world's richest lottery. the story of el gordo is next on "cbs this morning." and it feels like your life revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma or other types of cancer have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region wher
are investigating. spain, police arrested 35 people near madrid and seized more than 12 tons of a product of can any-cannabis. supplying the european market. belgium, chocolateers, guiness world record certifying the creation. the candy makers saying it took more than 780 hours and 2700 pounds of chocolate to make. um-huh and that's a rap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> harris: santa, please remember to pay your taxes. that's what tax officials are telling street entertainers in cash strapped ukraine. the government there facing $9 billion in debt repayments next year. so, people who dress up as santa claus can reportedly make up to 440 bucks an hour performing in the capitol the state tax service has reminded those holiday entertainers to file forms and pay their taxes. cannot tax checks on small businesses urging ukrainian citizens to report any tax dodging santas. would you want to be the one to turn in santa? it may have been the year of the dragon in china. 2012 was filled with all source of critters and their wild moments caught on camera. next, a look back at a big year in
mellon wealth management >>> the russians don't want anybody in spain but the spanish. is that scary? they're communists, yes, but they want total disarmament? no. is that scary? hitler and mussolini are using the spanish earth for testing ground for what they want -- another world war. is that scary? you're darn right it is. >> barbara streisand in "the way we were." that's my synchle favorite movie. i told robert redford when he came in. he said he was resisting your call for a sequel ever since. >> it's such a good story, the sequel. i'm still after him. >> he's never made a sequel to anything. he doesn't believe in sequels. >> i understand that. this happens to be a great story. i wanted it to be released on the 25th anniversary. >> what would have happened? >> it was just a very interesting story through their daughter and her political activism at berkeley in 1968 and the democratic national convention which is very interesting. it was a beautiful love story again. >> we spent most of the last month e-mailing each other about barack obama and mitt romney. you were tearing me of
another in the wrong direction. at the end of that journey the destination is greece or spain or italy. melissa: right. >> we have to figure out how to get control of intitlements. the while house refuses to have adult conversation about that. melissa: neither of these proposals, neither side gets us closer to closing the enormous gap you're talking about. i say over and over again and if this was your household and bills were so far out of line with what the revenue was you could get very serious very quickly. these people do not seem to do that. for republicans is it looking more and more palatable to go over the cliff at this point? >> depends on how dogmatic obama is. like selling a car on craig's list and put it up for 5,000 and really take 4500. someone offers you 4,000. this is classic negotiating. we have to be serious. this isn't just a game. we're not playing poker on a thursday night. if we don't get fix our fiscal problem, by the way to give republicans credit, i just don't want to attack them, they passed the ryan budget earlier this year and last year and that actually do
over the weekend. the ibex down over the weekend. so spain and portugal, seeing its index down over more than is % is showing its concern. joe, the ftse is at least holding up relatively better. it's down only .3% today. these losses follow a trading session that was setting up to be relatively strong. we saw asian stoxx doing decently well, so just kind of underscores how unhappy the market is this morning with this news out of italy. look at what's happening with debt. as we check in with bond markets, the italian tenure is seeing its yield rise. 4.88%. i know it doesn't seem that high, given some levels we were at last year. but if you consider that we've risen, i don't know, in the range of 30 to 40 basis points or .3 percentage points just on this news, it is pretty significant. spain, same thing, we're seeing 5.67 about the level there. other bond yields are benefiting as a result. back over to you guys. i'm sure carolin, too, can help us try to understand now what this all means with mario monti potentially still involved with the next eye toolan government. that may help rea
the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a couple of the key questions will be how much mario draghi follows ben bernan bernanke's caps, maybe even cutting into positive territory. expect to hear plenty more about that in the weeks to come. but for now, some resolution means this is front and center for these fiscal cliffs. back over to you guys. >> kelly, have your b
. take 15% youth unemployment in spain and compound that with the fact they stop having babies. what happens in a generation or two. >> i tell you, bill, you got me thinking, i encourage readers to read this. in some of the biggest developed economies pushed the most growth are below a 2% utility rate. this has to be dealt with at some point. back to you. >> thanks, rick. >>> road trip and big bank is in highways an byways in the road for yield. we'll explain how. and actually. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. stamps.com is the best. i don't have to leave my desk and get up and go to the post office anymore. [ male announcer ] with stamps.com you can print real u.s. postage for all your letters and packages. i have exactly the amount of postage i need, the instant i need it. can you print only stamps? no... first class. priority mail. certified. international. and the mail man picks it up. i don't leave the shop anymore. [ male announcer ] get a 4 week trial plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com
every day. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> let me finish tonight with this. here's a "hardball" take away for you. think about the role played this past election year by percentages. remember one percent? that was the battle cry of the movement. that one percent that focused on the very top of this country's economic pile had a lot of influence. it persuaded a lot of fair bs. here's another one. eight percent. obama hadn't gotten that unemployment rate down below that number, he would have had a far harder time winning last month. i believe i said this earlier in the campaign. if it was under agt, obama would become the faif rit. if not, he wouldn't. ma imag
the lines of what spain did or ireland or greece, cut back our social programs dramatically. we'll have to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on everyone and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business an
? we believe that every time italy and spain would have to raise money, do those deals, interest rates would shoot through the roof, bankrupting all involved, sovereign countries, companies, banks. instead, by letting cooler heads prevail through can kicking, smart private sector investors kicked the tires, not the cans, and they bought the debt. hit home runs every time they did. as rates came down hard, courtesy of bank backstop that did work. the europeans realized if they stopped the can kicking game cold like so many investors claimed they had to do, well, europe would go into severe depression. they didn't want that kind of austerity, their leaders bought time by kicking the can and that's what was most needed, time. they bought time. how well did it work? considering rates are not only not dramatically higher, they're dramatically lower, and the euro right now, strongest currency in the world. hmm, i thought the euro was supposed to vanish by this time with the secret sellers around the country. i thought greece was supposed to be kicked out of the union. instead, my advice, do
that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much
production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. we wrap it up with best advice. >> the best advice from singer/songwriter/american idol contestant adam lambert. >> the best advice i got, keep your eye on the prize. don't let anything distract you. you have a goal, take a risk and go after it. and don't let anything slow you down. don't let anything compromise that journey. head straight toward the goal. >> always bring your eye liner. >> yes. clearly. >> a lot of advice in that clip. >> and a lot of eye liner. >> he wears it well. >> that is all for "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. "starting point" starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
% in spain. there was an italian debt auction that went over well. that's helping sentiment. the owner of zara, one of the strongest retailers in europe, out with sales. you see that their shares are down. even though their nine-month sales figure was up 17% year on year, they said so far in the fourth quarter that figure was slowing to something in the range of 15%. so still a strong set of figures from inbitex. if you're concerned about the consumer, but not as strong as we have seen in the past. that's what's happening in spain. i want to draw your attention -- use guys were talking about unions. here's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the la
's going to be a lot of protests in spain, for example, today. foreign exchange, if we look at the dollar/yen, we look how quantitative easing is going to be a much more enhanced program in japan after the elections. you can clearly see how the dollar has performed quite admirably against that weakening of the currency issue on quantitative easing. remember, for an export economy, this is not something they're so upset about. last, but not least, even our weakened partner in europe, we just discussed, look how the euro versus the dollar is at some of the best levels we've seen since early may. something to pay attention to. we also had empire index on the weak side. and minus 56 billion on october treasury, international capital flows. that's the weakest level since the summer of 2011. now we're going to go to david faber who's talking about a sprint clear wire deal. how clear is it, david? >> we did get the deal itself, rick santelli. thank you very much. after a couple of months of which we've been talking about this. if you recall, back on october 10th, we got the deal this morning in
wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. ♪ cisco. tomorrow starts here. cisco. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back.
, spain, great britain and mexico. they were found on the issue of slavery in the territory and southern nationalism. when you think about the jefferson-jackson party formation what they had was truly affect. bottled up along the eastern seaboard and they gained control over course of 50 years of the entire continent, the pacific. there is no possibility is that americans could settle that territory of the time. the the united states gained control of the arizona territory in 1846. it didn't become a state until 1914. the louisiana purchase the would begin to settle it in the 1850's when the slavery issue for the country apart. the republican regime orchestrated the industrialization of the nation based on the concept of economic liberty, the tariff and the gold standard. in 1865 the united states was an agricultural country about 30 million. when they were overthrown and was a highly industrialized country and probably the most prosperous country in the world. that wasn't six ackley known by americans at the time. >> i met the party platforms of the republican party and the democratic
%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in boston that couldn't aafford to get their children he anything. this year for almost six decades help kamt no
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> chase kowalski completed his first little kid's mini triathlon. he was a cub scout who played baseball, enjoyed the kids workshop at the home depot as well, 7 years old. injo injoining us now, dr. drew pinske. thanks so much. how important is it first of all for these other kids, nearly 600 of them, to get back into a regular school routine? >> it's very important, wolf, that these parents tell their kids that they're going to be safe and they need to
economies in the global economy. she was less bullish on the idea that greece or spain or anybody else in trouble might effect the u.s. economy. she said, you know, the problem with the u.s. is internal, and it becomes a world problem. >> what do you think about the supreme court, they're now going to consider california's proposition 8, consider same sex marriage in the united states. >> i think it raises obviously to the highest court in the land a question that has bounced around the states with different verdicts. you have had a lot of states had constitutional amendments banning same sex marriage, california said yes, then has said no. you had for the first time the past election a couple states pass it in a statewide referendum, when previously when it was on the ballot it had gone down. this is a question that has had different answers in some states, and some states different answers different times within the same state. the supreme court providing a road map is helpful, if you want a 50 state solution. the question is is that what the constitution calls for. >> and will they
for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a boost in pc sales. is there anything that can turn that lagging sector around? futures moving lower, as concerns about the fiscal cliff talks weigh on the market. talks about progress toward a deal sent the down lower by almost 521 points on friday. s&p up almost 14% on the year. it's interesting, this year we've had so many unnatural phenomenon taking place, whether it's the effects of the fed's monetary policy, year end, fiscal cliff tax related issues. the motivations are a little bit different this ti
of champagnes and other sparkling wines, this is from spain. sparkling wines, different places in the u.s. and in the country around the country, i have different sparkling wines. i have chandon, proseco from italy. >> juliet: with a little straw there. >> fun minis. >> juliet: for people who have no desire to make their own drinks. thank you very much. we'll get all this information out on our web site. >> cocktailguru.com. >> juliet: thank you so much. we're going to take a quick break. we'll be back in two minutes. stay with us [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. . . with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!
-- in many senses you could call it profit taking -- not in the case of spain where you see a major underperformance. >> let me say the german finance minister suggested he thought the worst of the eurozone crisis is now past. he said the government in athens knows it cannot financially over burden the rest of the eurozone countries and is acting as it should. he was optimistic on france as well despite the fact the data is indicating we'll still get a contraction in the third quarter, for most of the eurozone. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can becaus
spain. $9.99 a bottle, a big, robust full-flavored red wine. one of the secret tricks of the wine business, if you look on the back of the bottle it says eric solomon selections. one thing is there are importers who act as curators. they only bring in things they love. importers are always on the back of the bottle. without knowing the wine, you know it's going to be a good wine. that is a little insider. >> you didn't love that? >> no, i did. if you're not an expert, there is a $9.99, how do you know it's that one and not sort of a cheap wine? >> partly by tasting a lot. go to a good store. first advice is find a store where people pay attention to you, listen to what you say, listen to what you like. they are not going to try to sell you something that's bad because they want your business to come back. trust those guys. it's good. >> pascual toso, argentine malbec. that is $10.99 a bottle. holiday buying. you know you're going to pour wine for a lot of people. buy by the case. most stores give you 10% -- you need to buy lots and lots of wine. 10%, 15% is standard. we bought the
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)